Busting Myths About Arthritis

Busting Myths About Arthritis

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Think you’re alone in suffering from arthritis? You’re not. People spend more than $130 billion—yes, billion—on arthritis treatments each year. So it should come as no surprise that physicians, researchers, and, well, the rest of us are always on the lookout for the latest ways to ease pain, no matter how costly they are.

Arthritis shouldn’t keep you on the sidelines of a vibrant, active life. You can combat the pain and stiffness with regular daily exercise. Start by separating truth from fiction and discover why exercise may just be the most effective means of dealing with the symptoms of arthritis.

Arthritis Happens only to old people
This is a common misconception, as data collected over the years has shown us that two-thirds of people with arthritis are younger than 65, and a recent study found that it affects nearly 1 in 250 children.The reason people think this is because osteoarthritis tends to happen in older people, and often individuals confuse the two.
The types of arthritis characterized by joint inflammation, such as rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis, can happen at any age

Exercise produces joint pain
The more sedentary you are, the more things are going to hurt. Exercise helps make it better by building strength and flexibility and controlling weight. One less pound on the scale, in fact, equals four pounds less pressure on your knees. To keep your body happy, especially when you’re starting out, alternate easy days with more challenging days. Heading for the pool or using a stationary bike in lieu of a brisk walk when pain is more bothersome is always an option as well.

There’s Not Much People Can Do to Treat Arthritis
No one should ever be told, ‘It’s just arthritis’, or that they should just live with it.While there is no cure for arthritis, there are many available options to alleviate symptoms so people can lead normal lives. The type of therapy that will bring on the most relief depends on the type of arthritis a person has, because health care providers may approach each condition differently.
There are many more effective options available for rheumatoid arthritis than there were about 20 years ago, making it possible to attack this malady in its early stages.
There are also numerous remedies available for osteoarthritis, including anti-inflammatory medications, physical therapy and occupational therapy.
There are more than 130 different types of arthritis, so the first step toward improving quality of life is to see a specialist and identify what type of arthritis a person has to determine the best treatment options.

Cracking Knuckles Can Cause Arthritis
Many people crack their knuckles because it helps their joints feel less stiff, but they may have heard it’s a habit that could someday cause arthritis. There actually have been studies that attempted to evaluate whether cracking knuckles increases the risk of developing arthritis.
These studies didn’t show any link, so we can’t say there’s any association between the two but according to the Johns Hopkins Arthritis Center, a couple of medical reports found a link between cracking knuckles and injury to the ligaments surrounding the joint or to dislocation of the tendons. Another study found that people who crack their knuckles may not grip items as strongly as people who don’t crack their knuckles.

One of the most effective ways to deal with arthritis is through physical therapy. Through effective muscle strengthening exercises, you can improve the situation greatly.